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Child protection officer

Child protection officers promote children's wellbeing and protect them from harm or abuse.

Potential salary

£25,000 to £40,000

Employment by 2024

+4.73%

Working hours

37 to 40 a week

  • counselling skills including active listening and a non-judgemental approach
  • sensitivity and understanding
  • patience and the ability to remain calm in stressful situations
  • to be flexible and open to change
  • the ability to work well with others
  • knowledge of psychology
  • the ability to accept criticism and work well under pressure
  • active listening skills
  • excellent verbal communication skills
  • to be able to use a computer and the main software packages competently

You day-to-day duties may include:

  • working with other professionals to identify children at risk
  • speaking with children, families and carers to assess their needs
  • investigating reported concerns and allegations
  • advising on child protection issues
  • promoting children's rights, safety and wellbeing
  • writing care plans and arranging support
  • making referrals to partner agencies
  • recording case details and writing reports
  • giving evidence in court
  • attending training courses

You could work in an office or visit sites.

Your working environment may be emotionally demanding and you may spend nights away from home.

You could become a lead officer, co-ordinating the work of your organisation's child protection team.

You could also work for safeguarding partnerships between local authorities, schools, health bodies, charities and social services.

With further training and experience, you could become a children's services inspector or a self-employed consultant, delivering training and advising organisations on child protection policies and regulations.

You can find out more about working in child protection from the British Association of Social Workers and NSPCC Learning.

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